MCL and LCL Tear Overview

Healthy Knee Arthritic Knee
Healthy MCL MCL Tear

The MCL (medial collateral ligament) connects the femur and tibia on the inner side (between the knees) and resists forces acting on the outer side of the knee, and the LCL (lateral collateral ligament) connects the femur and tibia on the outside of the knee and resists forces acting on the inner side of the knee. The two ligaments provide support and stability to the knee. The MCL is injured more often than the LCL because these injuries are often caused by a blow to the outer side of the knee (as seen in contact sports). This blow stretches and tears the ligaments on the inner side of the knee.

Initial symptoms of MCL and LCL tears include pain, stiffness, swelling and tenderness along the inner side or outside of the knee. In addition, the knee may feel unsteady or it may lock or catch.

Biomet is a manufacturer of orthopedic implants and does not practice medicine.

This information was prepared in conjunction with a licensed physician and is presented as general information only. Only an orthopedic surgeon can determine what treatment is appropriate. The life of any implant will depend on your weight, age, activity level, and other factors. For more information on risks, warnings, and possible adverse effects, see the Patient Risk Information section found within Biomet.com. Always ask your doctor if you have any questions regarding your particular condition or treatment options.

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